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Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy (WPCISP)
Chair:   
Ms. Tracey Weisler   
(United States)
Vice-Chairs:   
Ms. Pamela Miller   
(Canada)
Mr. Tobias Katzschmann   
(Germany)
Mr. Yair Hakak   
(Israel)
Ms. Isabella Maria Palombini   
(Italy)
Mr. Masanari Yashiro   
(Japan)
Mr. Je Myung Ryu   
(Korea)
Mr. Mario Germán Fromow Rangel   
(Mexico)
Mr. Bengt G Mölleryd   
(Sweden)
Members:   
Open to all Member countries 
Participants:   
Colombia   
South Africa   
Costa Rica   
Egypt   
Lithuania   
Singapore   
Russian Federation   
Observer (International Organisation):   
International Telecommunication Union (ITU)   
Date of creation:
24th March 1988
Duration:
31st December 2018

NOTE BY THE SECRETARIAT

At its meeting on 17-18 November 2016, the CDEP renewed the mandates of its Working Parties (WP-CISP, WP-SPDE and WP-MADE) until December 2018, subject to a few changes which are reflected in the Annex to this revised document.

Renewal of the cdep working parties' mandates

Introduction

   The renewal of the mandate of the CDEP Working Parties (every other year) provides an opportunity to address important new demands in relation to each biennial programme of work. In the course of 2016, discussions of the WP mandates highlighted that, while overall the existing mandates were still relevant, a reinforcement of digital economy measurement and statistics was needed, particularly in the context of the planned horizontal project on digitalisation across the economy and society.

   As the use of digital technologies spreads to a wide range of activities, e.g. health, education, transport, etc. its measurement requires theoretical approaches and statistical methodologies that go beyond ICTs and are specific to the activity considered. For instance, measuring skills for the digital economy requires expertise in the fields of ICTs, education and labour. Digital security and the Internet of Things are other examples of areas where measurement requires a combination of technical, statistical, legal and economic expertise.

   Increasing diffusion of digital technologies has also shifted the attention of policy-makers from access to such technologies to their effects on the economy and the society. In most countries, indeed, digital economy policies have become a key measure to foster innovation, growth and social prosperity.

   While statistics about the use of digital technologies provide an essential piece of information, any assessment of the effects of digital technologies and digital economy policies requires fairly sophisticated analytical work. For instance, comparing ICT investment and GDP per worker among countries is not enough to estimate the effect of ICTs on productivity without a suitable econometric model accounting for other cross-country differences, e.g. skills, regulations, etc. Similarly, public support to ICT investments may have different effects on firms’ productivity depending on the features of the national programmes, e.g. eligibility, conditionality, etc.

   This paper sets out a proposal to improve digital economy measurement and analysis in the work of CDEP, with consequent suggested amendments to the CDEP's Working Parties' mandates.

1. Proposal for improving the measurement and analysis of the digital economy

   This proposal builds on discussions in the CDEP earlier this year aimed to improve the Committee’s capability to measure the digital economy and to assess the effects of digital economy policies.

Improving measurement through thematic task forces

   Under their current mandates, working parties have been co-operating in the measurement work, e.g. CISP-MADE methodological work on hedonic prices in telecommunication, MADE-SPDE statistical paper on digital security experts. However, each working party has maintained the main responsibility for measurement in its own area. In addition, while CDEP working parties bring together world-class expertise in their specific domains, further improvement in measurement of the digital economy requires a broader set of competences.

   A statistical task force, composed of delegates and international experts, would help deepen the co-operation among CDEP’s working parties in measurement and bring together specialised expertise that is not represented in any of the working parties. Such a task force should have three main characteristics: i) a variable composition according to the area of measurement selected; ii) a small set of well-defined measurement tasks, iii) a fixed period of time to carry out the work (sunset).

   For a task force to work effectively, it is essential that CDEP and all its working parties ensure that the relevant expertise and resources are mobilised. To this purpose, a task force should be chaired by the working parties’ Chairs, with the support of the OECD Secretariat. When asked to cover areas of work of other OECD Committees and working parties, the task force should search for the participation of these bodies and the contribution of their experts.

   Based on the Programme of Work and Budget for 2017-18, it is proposed to informally establish two statistical task forces. Their activity will start on 1 January 2017 and, unless CDEP decides differently, end on 31 December 2018.

· The first task force would be on digital security and privacy. Its aim will be to: i) develop a model survey on digital security risk management in firms; ii) drive the international harmonisation of statistics reported in compliance with national data breaches regulations; iii) provide comparable statistics on the demand for and the supply of digital security experts; iv) propose ways to measure the development of security/privacy by design and automatic security/privacy tools; and v) develop a draft roadmap for the measurement of digital security and privacy in the biennium 2019-20. CDEP and each of its working parties would nominate a small number (5 to 8) of delegates and national experts to the task force, which would be co-chaired by the Chairs of SPDE and MADE.

· The second task force would be on Internet of Things (IoT). Its aim will be to: i) develop statistical definitions and nomenclatures about IoT; ii) provide a survey of existing data on IoT from official and private sources; iii) develop a module about IoT to be included in the OECD Model Surveys on ICT Usage by Enterprises and by Households, as appropriate; and iv) collect and publish statistical indicators on IoT based on the above sources. CDEP and each of its working parties would nominate a small number (5 to 8) of delegates and national experts to the task force, which would be co-chaired by the Chairs of CISP and MADE.

Reorienting MADE's work to improve the evidence-base for the assessment of digital economy policies

   Any measurement of the economic and social effects of digital economy policies requires an analytical assessment that statistics alone cannot provide. The role of CDEP would be strengthened by a more systematic analysis that helps to identify successful policies and less effective measures across countries. While the final assessment of these policies remains a prerogative of CDEP, the findings of the analytical work would inform this assessment based on a sounder and broader evidence base.

   In order to achieve this outcome, it is proposed to orient the work of MADE more explicitly towards the analysis of the effects of digital economy policies, in line with the PWB 2017-18, Output 1.5 “Measuring the effects of national digital strategies/policies”.

   This reorientation of the MADE's mandate should be reflected by an enlargement in the composition of its national delegations. Currently, MADE is mainly composed of statisticians responsible for the collection and development of statistics on ICT usage by households, individual and firms in their own country. While the expertise provided by the current composition has been very valuable and will continue to be crucial in the future, it is necessary to strengthen the analytical capability of the working party by increasing the participation of analysts[1] in the national delegations.

   For the national delegations, the enlargement of the composition of MADE would require either: i) the participation of two delegates, one statistician and one analyst, as it is currently the case for a small number of countries, e.g. Sweden, or ii) the participation of one delegate with both statistical and analytical expertise, e.g. the US.

2. Proposal for renewal of the CDEP Working Parties' mandates for 2017-18

Working Party on Security and Privacy in the Digital Economy (SPDE)

Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy (CISP)

Working Party on Measurement and Analysis of the Digital Economy (WPMADE)

The mandates of the CDEP WPs in 2017-18

   In order to improve the measurement of the digital economy and strengthen the evidence base for digital economy policy, it is proposed to amend the mandates of the CDEP’s working parties in 2017-18 as follows:

· The request that working parties work together to improve measurement is made explicit in the mandate of each of them. In particular, all three working parties shall co-operate in “the development of new indicators and statistical methodologies, and the collection of internationally comparable data to improve the evidence base for policy-making in the digital economy. This work should be undertaken in the light of policy priorities expressed by the Committee and by member countries”.

· The mandate of MADE is modified as to include the request “to analyse the contribution of digital economy policies to economic performances and social outcomes” and, in particular, to “undertake the evaluation of the impact of digital economy policies on economic performance, notably on growth, productivity and innovation, and on social well-being”.

   In addition, to ensure the continuation of the Committee's work on data-driven innovation, it is proposed to modify the mandate of SPDE so as to include a reference to the increasingly data-driven economy and to request more specifically that work on "the enhancement of access to data to foster digital innovation" be conducted.

 

revised terms of reference for the Working Party on Security and Privacy in the Digital Economy (SPDE)

Extract from document [DSTI/ICCP(2013)17/ANN]

 

Working Party on Security and Privacy in the Digital Economy (WPSPDE)

Terms of Reference

“Taking into account the objectives of the Committee on Digital Economy Policy, the mandate of the Working Party on Security and Privacy in the Digital Economy (WPSPDE) shall be to develop and promote evidence-based policies to strengthen trust in the increasingly data-driven digital economy, with a particular focus on the management of digital security risks to economic and social activities, the protection of privacy and personal data, and the enhancement of access to data to foster digital innovation. In accomplishing its mandate, the Working Party shall:

1.   Research and monitor relevant developments while paying due attention to the emergence of new technologies and services;

2.   Assess, amend and develop policies, particularly in areas in which there is an increased need for co-operation across international borders;

3.   Exchange information and share experiences on policy approaches;

4.   Contribute, in co-operation with WPMADE, WPCISP and other relevant bodies to the development of new indicators and statistical methodologies and the collection of internationally comparable data to improve the evidence base for policy-making in its areas of competence. This work should be undertaken in light of the policy priorities expressed by the Committee, with the support of a joint experts group, as appropriate.

5.    Promote the objectives and assess the implementation of relevant OECD Recommendations and Declarations, policy frameworks, and strategies.

The Working Party will undertake work as requested by the Committee on Digital Economy Policy (CDEP) and will submit on a regular basis to the Committee the results of its work.

The Working Party shall maintain close working relationships with other relevant bodies within the OECD to ensure complementarity of efforts and effective use of resources. In the conduct of its work, the Working Party will also, as appropriate, draw on the views and expertise of Partners (i.e. non-members), international organisations and non-governmental stakeholders, and work with business, organised labour, civil society, and the Internet technical community within a framework of co-operation that promotes mutual understanding and participation.

The mandate of the Working Party on Security and Privacy in the Digital Economy shall remain in force until 31 December 2018, unless the CDEP decides otherwise.”


revised terms of reference of the Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy (CISP)

Extract from document [DSTI/ICCP(2013)17/ANN]

 

Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy (WPCISP)

 

Terms of Reference

 

“Taking into account the objectives of the Committee on Digital Economy Policy, the mandate of the Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy (WPCISP) shall be:

   1.   To explore the different goals and analyse the strategies of Members and, as appropriate, Partners (i.e. non-members) in the area of communication infrastructures and services, including communication-related platforms and industries, in order to promote a common understanding of policies and increase international co‑operation.

   2.   To promote exchanges of experience and best practice among Members and with Partners and review global developments in the field of communication infrastructures and services policy and develop tools for measurement and international comparison.

   3. To contribute, in co-operation with WPMADE, WPSPDE and other relevant bodies, to the development of new indicators and statistical methodologies and the collection of internationally comparable data to improve the evidence base for policy-making in its areas of competence. This work should be undertaken in light of the policy priorities expressed by the Committee, with the support of a joint experts group, as appropriate.

   4.   To analyse the economic and social implications of changing communication market structures and technological developments, from both supply and demand-side perspectives. This will include the areas of the Internet and the convergence between the broadcasting, media and telecommunication sectors, the development of next-generation networks and increased broadband access.

   5.   To analyse international and trade issues in communications and information services, and promote co-operation in this field.

   6.   The Working Party shall maintain close working relationships with other relevant bodies within the OECD to ensure complementarity of efforts and effective use of resources. In the conduct of its work, the Working Party will also, as appropriate, draw on the views and expertise of Partners, international organisations and non-governmental stakeholders, and work with business, organised labour, civil society, and the Internet technical community within a framework of co-operation that promotes mutual understanding and participation.

   7.   The Working Party will undertake work as requested by the Committee on Digital Economy Policy (CDEP), and submit on a regular basis the results of its work for review by this Committee.

The mandate of the Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy shall remain in force until 31 December 2018, unless the CDEP decides otherwise.”

 


revised terms of references of the Working Party on Measurement and Analysis of the Digital Economy (WPMADE)

Extract from document [DSTI/ICCP(2013)17/ANN]

 

Working Party on Measurement and Analysis in the Digital Economy (WPMADE)

 

Terms of Reference

 

Taking into account the objectives of the Committee on Digital Economy Policy, the mandate of the Working Party on Measurement and Economic Analysis (WPMADE) shall be to lead the measurement of the digital economy and to analyse the contribution of digital economy policies to economic performance and social outcomes.

More specifically, the Working Party will:

1. Lead, in cooperation with WPCISP and WPSPDE, the development of statistical methodologies and cross-country indicators to improve the evidence base for policy-making in the digital economy. This work should be undertaken in light of the policy priorities expressed by the Committee.

2. Develop and maintain standards for measuring value added, employment and trade in information and communication industries and products as well as access and effective use of digital technologies by individuals, firms and governments.

3. Undertake the evaluation of the effects of digital economy policies on economic performance, notably on growth, productivity, innovation, skills as well as well-being.

The Working Party will co-operate, in particular, with other OECD statistical sub-groups and working parties in dealing with broader statistical issues.

The Working Party will act as a clearing house through which members and Partners (i.e. non-members), other international organisations and non-governmental stakeholders can exchange information and experience on methods of collection, compilation, analysis and presentation of data on the digital economy, thus effectively sharing the knowledge of the group with a wider audience.

The mandate of the Working Party on Measurement and Economic Analysis shall remain in force until 31 December 2018, unless the CDEP decides otherwise.”

 

 

 


[1] The desirable profile for an analyst would be an economist or social scientist, with significant experience in applied analysis (e.g. econometrics) and policy assessment in an area related to the digital economy, e.g. firm organisation, productivity, innovation, etc. These persons are likely to have been working at the university or in a research or support for policy development department of a Ministry, the Central Bank or other institutions supporting the government.
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